Resolution 2013 – 1 of 2

The following resolution(s) were submitted at the Annual Conference and requires a membership approval. Resolutions that have bylaw and/or financial implications must be vote and approved by the 2/3s of the voting membership. This resolution will be available for discussion for 2 weeks, Sept 23-Oct.6). At the end of the resolution, the NACCS Board offers a PRO/CON discussion. From October 8-21, the membership will vote on the resolution. Details will be emailed to members.

PROPOSED BY THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOCO
Contact: Linda Heidenreich (509) 592-7098 lheidenr@wsu.edu

Reducing Student Registration Fees
Whereas many of our most active members became active in the National Association for Chicana and Chicana Studies while we were either undergraduate or graduate students and received invaluable mentoring and support through the organization and
Whereas providing mentoring and professional development of the next generation of Chicana/o Studies scholars is critical to the longterm flourishing of the organization and inter-discipline and
Whereas many students now find a $90 conference registration fee prohibitive
Therefore be it resolved that beginning with the national NACCS Conference 2014, student conference registration fees be set at $50 until voted otherwise by the membership. (This has budget implications and will have to require a 2/3 vote.)

Argument PRO:
1. Appropriately recognizes the importance of NACCS in providing mentoring and professional development of the next generation of Chicana/o Studies scholars.
2. Recognizes students are particularly vulnerable among NACCS members/presenters to economic pressures

Arguments CON:
1. It does not quantify the number of members/presenters: “many students now find a $90 conference registration fee prohibitive.”
2. It does not indicate how the proposed lower fee of $50 was reached nor how it compares to student rates of other academic associations (e.g., AASA, AIS, AHA, APIA, ASA, MLA, NWA, etc.). It should also be noted that many professional organizations required that individuals be members in order to only submit a proposal for conference participation. NACCS does not require membership just to submit – it does after the proposal has been accepted.
3. It does not acknowledge alternatives for students who cannot afford the present fee, for example, encouraging faculty members to sponsor university travel funding for students.
4. It does not figure in the ever-increasing audio-visual and internet expenses requested by presenters at the conference.
5. It would necessitate and increase in fees for every other presenter group to compensate for the reduced student rate, perhaps increasing pressures on other groups making them unable to present.
6. Would have financial impact on NACCS’ limited revenue and therefore requires a 2/3 vote of approving adoption of the change.

One Response to “Resolution 2013 – 1 of 2”

  1. NACCS Says:

    Dear 2013 NACCS member,

    NACCS is currently voting on resolutions. I am writing to ask that you VOTE NO on the reduced student registration fee.

    NACCS has a long history of supporting students. In fact of all the academic organizations it is probably the most welcoming and makes concrete efforts to mentor students at all levels.

    Some examples are:

    – The Cervantes Student Premios – that has a financial award of $350.00 and dedicate a plenary to the winners (since 1985).
    – Since 2000 we have helped students attend the conference by granting up to 21 students one-night hotel costs free with our housing fellowship. Students usually share and end up paying a fraction of the total cost to attend the conference.
    – For years we have assisted students write proposals to their schools, departments, local groups, including their local Focos.
    – Since 2009 we have provided Immigrant Student Becas in award ranging from $450.00 to $2000.00.
    – We have always had a student Caucus which originally was for both undergraduate and graduate students until the Graduate students decided they wanted their own space in 1998.
    – We host a Graduate Student Reception intended to mentor all students to network, meet, and build relations
    – All receptions and ancillary events are open to students.
    – In 2002 we ceased having a Chicana Caucus breakfast or lunch so that anyone could attend the meetings.
    – Student member registration has not been increased while other categories have. Moreover students have one constant reg fee unlike other categories which have early bird, pre-conference and conference on-site registration.

    Everyone who works on NACCS Student participation in NACCS does so because they believe that a space for students and faculty is possible and necessary—it builds our pipeline and professoriate!

    To pass a resolution that allows students to pay $50 registration will cripple NACCS financially. Many of our current student support efforts will be put in jeopardy and ultimately someone else will need to pick up the difference. In fact everyone benefits from the reduced cost efforts.

    We have already made efforts to reduce cost of attending the conference by negotiating the lowest possible hotel rates, audio-visual contracts, and food and beverage requirements. Thus consciously seeking way to not have to pass additional cost to participants.

    With these sound financial practices we have insured that not only students but also community, faculty, and staff can participate in the annual conference.

    In addition to the items listed above as student support, here are a few more things NACCS specifically does for students – undergraduate and graduate:

    – A student presenting next to an established faculty scholar without being identified by status
    – No additional cost for the banquet-it is included in the registration fee.
    – No additional after conference activity tickets
    – No additional charge for AV equipment
    – Opportunity for student participation in leadership

    All these concessions go well beyond the $45 difference and the $95.00 current student registration fee is already subsidized by NACCS. This is a small investment in an organization that ought to be part of a young person’s future in Chicana and Chicano Studies.

    A yes on this resolution is a sure bet that things will change in NACCS. Everyone will suffer higher costs. Some of the existing student concessions will have to be rethought to keep NACCS a sustainable organization.

    This resolution is fiscally irresponsible.

    Lastly, NACCS is member supported. This is extremely important. NACCS does not seek nor get corporate sponsorship as a choice of principle and ethics.

    I ask that you VOTE NO on the reduced conference fees for students. I also invite everyone to think of a better solution to student subsidies—donate to NACCS, find support at your institutions, sponsor students. A SUSTAINABLE NACCS is an investment in your commitments, your academic success, and in the end an insurance of another 100 years of our existence.

    Julia E. Curry Rodriguez, Ph.D.
    NACCS Executive Director